December 2018, and the erosion continues on our beach after recent storms.

FIPPOA:
The number one concern of the residents is the delay in completing the FIMI project. We will soon be in the fifth year of the project. As I have said many times, this is a large Federal project. Projects of this sort do move very slowly, but they also move inexorably toward their conclusion. That’s how it is and we deal with it as best we can. I deal with the project almost daily, participating in multiple meetings each week dealing either with the demolition now going on or with the construction which is to follow. I can assure you, it is coming and will be completed next year. In the meantime, we do everything we can to speed it along. The main part of the demolition phase should be complete in the five eastern communities in December with the contractor now working on Saturdays and Sundays toward that goal. I have pressed in the last week for the RFP for sand placement to be published and have a commitment that it will be out in the next few weeks. The only thing remaining after that is the award of the contract and then sand on the beach in the Pines. 

We are keenly aware of the vulnerability of the community this winter caused by recent erosion, particularly on the west end. We have been in discussions with our consultants, Land Use, as to what we can do to provide greater protection for the Pines now and over the winter. As I have informed you in the last newsletter, the trap bag repair project is no longer possible because of the lack of sand, extraordinary cost, and permit issues. We raised with the consultant the possibility of have FIPPOA do an intermittent line of the white sand bags, the kind that you see in front of some oceanfront homes. However, Land Use’s reportadvises first that the placement of the bags (by FIPPOA) would be illegal, and would create problems for the community in its continuing dealings with NYS agencies. And, second, they state that taking sand to fill the bags may actually be counterproductive. The only measure that they recommend at this time is that FIPPOA run a line of sand fence down the beach in a zig zag pattern which they believe may catch additional sand and build up the profile of the beach. The additional fence will be delivered to the community on Monday and installation will complete next week. The sand fence installation is being paid for from Seashore Defense Funds. 

We are keenly aware of the vulnerability of the community this winter caused by recent erosion, particularly on the west end. We have been in discussions with our consultants, Land Use, as to what we can do to provide greater protection for the Pines now and over the winter. As I have informed you in the last newsletter, the trap bag repair project is no longer possible because of the lack of sand, extraordinary cost, and permit issues. We raised with the consultant the possibility of have FIPPOA do an intermittent line of the white sand bags, the kind that you see in front of some oceanfront homes. However, Land Use’s reportadvises first that the placement of the bags (by FIPPOA) would be illegal, and would create problems for the community in its continuing dealings with NYS agencies. And, second, they state that taking sand to fill the bags may actually be counterproductive. The only measure that they recommend at this time is that FIPPOA run a line of sand fence down the beach in a zig zag pattern which they believe may catch additional sand and build up the profile of the beach. The additional fence will be delivered to the community on Monday and installation will complete next week. The sand fence installation is being paid for from Seashore Defense Funds.

Photo by Change at Babylon.

Pools and decks lost…

For future reference…