The H House 1965.

523 Snapper Walk

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Four pavilions connected by an open air living area create the letter H. Situated on the eastern end of the Pines and close to the bay this house was a hidden gem designed and built by noted architect Horace Gifford. A place he called home. Neglected by renters and owners for years and overgrown with vegetation the house had fallen into disrepair when Carlos Otero and Laurence Isaacson found it one  Saturday afternoon.

 

 

 

Horace gifford

They were completely surprised to find a sleeping beauty waiting to be awakened. Carlos and larry had enjoyed sharing rental properties with friends for years, but the time had come for a place of their own. Carlos , an architect and designer immediatly felt a certain obligation to restore the house, but there were many obstacles to overcome. A default mortgage, a planned move to Hong Kong for two years were just some of the challenges they faced. However they found an excellant contractor who they could work with from afar.

 

 

Before:

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They spent the summer in the house prior to restoration, drawing, planning, consulting original sources. It was easy for him to see beyond existing quirks like 1980 overhauls in most rooms taking away original charm. So began the labor intensive process of residing the cedar, replacing windows. Carlos ever mindful of original details, kept things essentially as Gifford had designed them. First to go was the overgrown front yard. Now in its place are grasses, holly trees, sand, and a pristine swimming pool. A simple Pines house as any other. The bathrooms, kitchen, and bedrooms are also exercises in restraint.

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You experience light moving through the house all day long which is all about Gifford’s design.

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Larry and Carlos fill the house with family and friends. The home is made for guests affording all with privacy, and intimacy at the same time.

 

bay

 

Thank you for the visit.

 

 

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carlos oteroh house

 

 

 

 

Copy by Miles Redd and Photographs by Ricardo Labougle.