The Gifford, Wittstein, Miller, & Bromley house Est. 1963-1981.

519 Porgie Walk.


Architect Horace Gifford’s (right) second house design for Robert Miller (left) and his partner Edwin Wittstein (not pictured) began as a sketch in the sand. 










Unlike his other design this one would not have a predictable view. The lot was purchased from Josephine La Fountaine for $3000, and was nestled in the woods on the eastern end with a short walk to the bay. With an octagon as its center Gifford decided to give the home multiple views from several corners of the octagon with coordinating decks.


The center with it’s vast roof created the social hub of the house. With its wooden windows and French doors giving it a lodge like feel. A perfect party house for the growing social scene in the Pines.


A young Horace Gifford with fellow resident Trudy Frank at 519 Porgie Walk.


As Gifford moved onto other areas a young up and coming architect named Scott Bromley had arrived in the Pines. With the design of the prestigious Studio 54 disco under his arm he became in fashion as the new go to architect. In a bold move that seemed destined Bromley purchases the home from Wittstein and Miller, and plans an expansion.











Using the same proportions and roof pitches as the original home, Bromley created a unique outdoor “tea house” that adds another element of intimacy to the space. The eastern deck is now a glass-enclosed dining room, through which you pass through into a new Master Bedroom that awaits behind a poplar scrim. For all of its changes, the center stage is still the octagonal living space that remains its soul…



























Living year round (weekends in the winter months) the house comes alive for every season.









Architect Scott Bromley remains active both as an architect serving the community, on outside projects with his firm Bromley Caldari, and as a board member of FIPHPS.  When not doing all that he can be found in his garden with his partner Tony Impavido and dog Louie…